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Lectures:Dietary Protein & Muscle Health: Translating the Science into Practical Application


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Presentation title: Dietary Protein & Muscle Health: Translating the Science into Practical Application

Time: 18:30 pm, May 21, 2019(Tuesday)

Place: D912, School of Food Science Technology, Jiangnan University

Reporter: Dr.Matthew Pikosky, Vice President of Nutrition Research for the National Dairy Council USA


Brief introduction of presenter:

Matthew Pikosky, PhD, RD, is Vice President of Nutrition Research for the National Dairy Council. He has over 15 years of nutrition research and scientific communications experience across government, non-profit and food and beverage industry. In his current role, Matt leads the Dairy Protein research program, the goal of which is to build the scientific evidence supporting unique consumer focused benefits of milk and dairy protein ingredients to strengthen marketplace positioning and catalyze industry innovation. Matt also works with leaders in the food and beverage industry to provide nutrition guidance to help drive menu and product innovations featuring dairy. Prior to joining the National Dairy Council, Matt served as a Senior Scientist in the Applied Medical Nutrition Science group at Nestlé Health Science, was the Director of Research Transfer and Vice President of Scientific Affairs for Dairy Management Inc. and served as a Research Physiologist at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine. Matt holds a Bachelor’s degree in Nutrition, a Master’s degree in Exercise Physiology and a Ph.D. in Nutrition all from the University of Connecticut where his research focused on defining optimal protein intakes for endurance athletes and physically active adults.




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