Lectures & Events
Location: Home >> Lectures & Events >> Content

Lectures:The chemical principle of health promoting constituents in fruits and vegetables: starch hydrolase inhibitors and dietary organosulfides as H2S donors


The author: source:食品学院  Click on the:[]  Update time:2019-10-28

Presentation title:The chemical principle of health promoting constituents in fruits and vegetables: starch hydrolase inhibitors and dietary organosulfides as H2S donors

Reporter:Prof. Dejian HUANG

Time: 14:30-15:30 pm,October 29, 2019

Place: B534, Synergetic Innovation Center, Jiangnan University

 

Brief introduction of presenter:

Dejian HUANG is a faculty member at Department of Food Science and Technology, National University of Singapore. He is also a senior research fellow of National University of Singapore (Suzhou) Research Institute.  Dejian received education Fujian Normal University (BSc in chemistry), Chinese Academy of Sciences (MSc in organic chemistry), and Indiana University Bloomington (PhD in Inorganic Chemistry).  He worked at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Postdoctoral Fellow) and Brunswick Laboratories, USA, (Senior Research Scientist) before he moved to Singapore. His research interests include the chemical principle of evidence-based functional foods. His major academic contributions including three granted patents, six patent applications, and over 150 peer-reviewed publications. His work has been cited by others more than 15 thousand times. He was named as one of the most highly cited scientists by Thomson-Reuters (2014 and 2015). Currently, Dr Huang is an associate editor of Journal of Functional Foods.

Abstract:

Ageing related chronic diseases, particularly cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes are the major threats to human health and the functional foods with sound scientific evidence are the key weapon to fight against these chronic diseases. In this lecture, I will present progress made by my research team on establishment of a few high throughput analytical methods for rapid discovery of bioactive constituents from edible plants, particularly fruits and vegetables. Using these assays as guides, we were able to isolate the bioactive compounds, study their structure-activity relationship and action mechanisms. In particular, I will illustrate two examples:

· Slow H2S donors found in fruits and vegetables such as stink bean and garlic.

· Starch hydrolase inhibitors from fruits, vegetables, and medicinal plants.

Our research achievements will lay molecular foundation for development of evidence-based functional foods for cardiovascular health promotion and management of post-prandial hyperglycemia.

 

 


On a:Workshop on Emulsion and Biopolymer Interaction

The next article:Lectures:Bio-inspired, targeted and intelligent nanocarbon complexes for bioengineering